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Archive for June, 2011

30
Jun
2011

Lauren Berger Featured in Reuters Article

InternQueen


Lauren Berger was recently featured in a Reuters article about the growing class of perma-interns. “Perma-interns” are interns that have extended their stays as interns past the traditional semester span and have used their company ties to secure more prominent positions. Read on for more information, and see what tips the Intern Queen has for playing the internship game the right way.

Perma-interns: Is working for free a good career bet?

30
Jun
2011

Start Your Business Now!

InternQueen

This is a video interview done with the Intern Queen, Lauren Berger. Watch as she shares tips on how you can get started TODAY!

30
Jun
2011

Have You Met Jeanette from ASU?

InternQueen

This is a Q&A with our lovely Intern Queen Campus Ambassador, Jeanette, from Arizona State.

1.      What are your three must-have items for an internship?

A notepad, Clinque powder (stay fresh!) and a piece of fruit.

2.     What are your three must visit websites each day?

Twitter, Intern Queen and Her Campus.

3.     What kind of cell phone do you have?

Samsung Replenish, I love it!

4.     Age-old question: Mac or PC?

Mac

5.     What has been your favorite part about being an Intern Queen Campus Ambassador?

I love talking to other students all around the country, its fun to get to know everyone!

6.     Any advice for other interns?

Work hard, stay positive and take advantage of opportunities.

30
Jun
2011

Organizations Every Communications Student Should Join!

InternQueen

This blog was written by Dalida our campus ambassador from Texas State University – San Marcos. If you go to the same university and want to blog for us, leave a comment on this blog!

Communication Clubs: (Social Media Club, PRSSA, Advertising Club, etc.)

These organizations truly help students become better professionals. They hold different networking events and also have speakers come talk to the members about all sorts of subjects in world of communications. With these organizations, you get a chance to put what you learn in class to use, with competitions against other chapters around the country. These organizations offer many networking opportunities at which you can talk to employers and industry professionals. As a member, you get to make connections with the many members of the organizations, whether in-state or out-of-state and with the connections, you have a huge chance at finding a job.

Fashion Organization

If there is one organization in college that helped me find my true calling, it is FashioNation. I have been a part of this fashion organization since it was started, I started off as a member and by the next year, I was the Public Relations chair. I loved being part of the organization because it gave me the opportunity to be myself and also grow as the organization grew. As I got more communications experience, the organization was right by my side, rising with every inch I grew. It helped me break out of my shell as I would go in search of new and better ways to market and promote our events. In my opinion, a fashion organization can help you find out who you are and exactly what you want. I was able to learn a lot about myself and what I have the power to do.

Newspaper

It’s always great to work for a newspaper, so that you can craft your writing skills. This will also be a challenge for yourself, a challenge to show you what kind of writer you are. Writing is important in the field of communications, and I strongly believe that working for a newspaper helps one develop an eye for news writing and what is considered news.

TV & Radio

Working for TV and Radio isn’t as easy as most people think. As you grow, from high school to college and then to the real world, it becomes even more intimidating and tough. With a TV station, depending on your school, you can cover major events and learn of ways to communicate to an audience that you cannot see. You’ll be able to craft your skills and learn to work in front of a camera and microphone.  And just like newspaper, you’ll learn what makes good news.

Do not forget to save all the work you do with your organizations for your portfolio!

30
Jun
2011

The 3 Month Rule

InternQueen

This is a blog post from Stephanie, our Intern Queen Campus Ambassador from Drexel University. If you attend Drexel and are interested in blogging for us, leave a comment below!

The 3 Month Rule

I’m currently working at my sixth internship this year. Since I started interning freshman year, I’ve met a lot of coworkers who became key mentors with a lot of career guidance and advice to share. However, it’s impossible to keep in touch with all of them on a consistent basis. In order to keep some organization to my contacts, I created the 3 Month Rule.

Every three months, I go through my contacts and do my best to email/call/Facebook the people I’m looking to stay in touch with, either as a mentor as a friend. Three months is the perfect amount of time to check-in, get new news from your contacts but not be excessive. This will be helpful when I graduate and look back at my network to hopefully land the perfect job!

If you’re looking for what to say when you send the initial check-in email, I have a few recommendations:

  • Ask for a resume review
  • Let them know that a project you worked on with them was helpful to you post-internship
  • Ask for advice on a job-related issue

The most important thing is to get in touch and keep in touch!

30
Jun
2011

New Campus Ambassador From Howard University!

InternQueen

Meet Criscia!

I am majoring in print journalism and minoring in business administration. On campus I am a News broadcaster the WHBC student radio station, a writer for MOSIK magazine (a campus fashion magazine) and a contributing writer for many other publications on campus. I am also a member of the Howard University Association of Black Journalists and the Howard University Student Association Volunteer Team. I am currently interning for a small business called Sylvan Media, a business focused on social media and search engine optimization. This is my first internship, but I am determined to complete at least 5 internships before I graduate. Internships are important to me because I believe getting experience in a field of work will help me in mastering my craft and deciding exactly what I want to do in the future. Internships will also make a person stand out when applying for a job. I think other students will enjoy reading about my personal college experiences because I am not an expert. I don’t know what I want to do after college. I am learning everyday and trying to grab hold of every opportunity I can.

30
Jun
2011

Intern Tip of the Day

InternQueen

This Video Blog was done by Dalida Umuhire. She is a CA from Texas State University. Check out her advice on Internships!

30
Jun
2011

My Undergraduate Bucket List

InternQueen

This blog post is written by Kristi, our Intern Queen Campus Ambassador from University of Idaho. If you also attend University of Idaho and are interested in blogging for us, leave a comment here!

My Top 10 Things to do Before I Graduate (Career-Oriented Edition)

In no order…

1 ) Learn a foreign language: We live in a globalized world and more and more people are speaking multiple languages. English is only the fourth most spoken language in the world behind Mandarin Chinese, Hindi, and Spanish.

2 ) Study Abroad: As the world becomes globalized, having an international perspective will give you an advantage your career. Travel will broaden and mature the traveler, and it shows some initiative and resourcefulness on your part. Employers love it.

3 ) Intern in another city: It’s amazing what you can learn outside the classroom, and your college town.

4 ) Learn to cook: At the very least, learn to cook one good meal. This has nothing to do with my career, but it might make me more confident.

5 ) Network: Take a few minutes and thank the professor that made the biggest impact on your life during college. That thank you might turn into an amazing letter of recommendation.

6 ) Hold a leadership position: Leadership is more important than your GPA, major, minor, or school name. College is a great time to develop your leadership skills because there are so many leadership opportunities in student government, student groups, fraternities, sororities, intramural sports, etc.

7 ) Start a blog….and twitter….and LinkedIn: The three of them are almost mandatory in today’s world or social media. It’s an easy way to stay connected with all your contacts in your field, whether they be fellow alumni, past employers, or networking contacts you’ve made along the way. You can also post your resume and gain recommendations.

8 ) Start a savings plan: self-explanatory?

9 ) Master at least one program: Take the time to learn beyond just the basic functions. Adobe and Microsoft programs are key. Dreamweaver will help you build a website. Photoshop and Indesign will help with design. Microsoft will complement the office work.

10 ) Perfect your resume: Chances are your resume has changed over the last four years. Make sure every word mentioned is how you want to be perceived to your (possibly) future employer.

11 ) Watch a lot of Ted Talks: Ted.com features videos of speaking appearances given by industry-changing and remarkable people. And best of all, they are free.

12 ) Get published: There are many ways to publish your work in college. You can write for the campus newspaper, publish an article with a professor that you’ve done research with, or you can publish a book. Being published by a source other than your own blog adds credibility to your ideas, thoughts, and writing.

30
Jun
2011

Volunteer and make a difference!

InternQueen

This blog is written by Catherine O. from Barton College. If you go to Barton, and are interested in blogging for us, please leave a comment on this blog!

Yes, we all know that the economy is a bit rough right now and trying to find a good paying part time and/or full time job can be a nit hard sometimes. However, don’t let that be your excuse to give up and not work at all. There are a lot of alternatives to this such as volunteering and making a difference.

Volunteering in your community is such a great thing to do. Even if you do it for a week or the entire summer, the main point is that you made a difference somewhere, for someone or for something. Some people say that they don’t see any good coming out of volunteering but I happen to disagree with that. Whether you know it or not volunteering is not only beneficial to the cause that you are helping but very beneficial to yourself. Volunteering looks good on your college application and resume. It can possibly lead to you getting a paying job or help you develop interests that you never knew about! Also, just giving you a good feeling that you did something good and people appreciate it!

With all of that being said, if you have spare time and you are just sitting on your mother’s couch go out and volunteer! Make a difference and enjoy it because you never know what may come out of it.

To give you that extra push, check out these websites listed below that will help you find that volunteer opportunity near you!

30
Jun
2011

Extreme Makeover: Résumé Edition

InternQueen

This blog was written by Heather E., our campus ambassador from the University of Notre Dame. Heather has a  double major in business and psychology and will be entering her sophomore year in the fall.

We have all heard that employers spend 30 seconds or less looking over your résumé. It is their first impression of you, and it is a quick one. This is the reason that it is absolutely vital to keep your résumé as concise as possible. Your résumé should never be over one page, no matter how much you think you just have to include that other club position or job you held. Let me repeat that, YOUR RESUME SHOULD NEVER BE LONGER THAN ONE PAGE. I know it is hard because you have a lot of relevant information and because you are proud of your accomplishments and want to include them all. Trust me, it is to your advantage to cut it down. This is how to do it:

#1) Don’t include high school accomplishments after your sophomore year of college. This is pretty self-explanatory. By the time you begin your junior year, you should have enough college experiences to fill your résumé. They are more relevant, and they are what employers are most interested in. However, if you have a really outstanding high school accomplishment, like being a National Merit Scholar, feel free to keep it.

#2) Think of your résumé as a Greatest Hits album. That means only include the best of what you have done. Your résumé should be about quality over quantity.  Only include your most relevant and/or impressive accomplishments. This might include officer positions or work experience in the field related to your potential job. If there are things you are particularly passionate about, include them in conversations with your prospective employer. Employers can and will ask you about anything on your résumé, and it is important to be able to speak about those subjects at length and with sincere enthusiasm. Your excitement will be noted by your potential employer and will make more of an impression than merely a blurb on paper.

#3) Addresses are unnecessary. So are references. Including addresses for all of the places you have worked or attended school is a waste of space. The city and state is all that is necessary, and can be used in the “Chicago, IL” format. Professional references should never be included on your résumé. They should be kept ready on a separate sheet with a similar style and heading to your main résumé. They can be given to an employer upon request. Other unnecessary components include coursework (unless it is applicable to the specific job you are applying to and is not apparent as part of your major course of study) and your “temporary address” (just use your home address, as long as your parents check the mail regularly).

#4) Decrease font size. Although you use 12-point font for papers, it is really much too large for a typical résumé. 9- or 10-point font is more acceptable, with 8- or 11–point being the outside extremes for font size. This is an easy but often forgotten trick.

#5) Use a grid/column format. Too often, we stack all of our information on top of itself without employing the full width of the page. Designate a certain number of columns (usually 3 – 5) and fit your information into them. Consider putting your main headings (Education, Work Experience, etc.) in the first column and the relevant information beside it. For example, your first column might say “Education,” your second column would say “The University of Notre Dame” with information like your GPA and major below it, and your third column would have the Location (“South Bend, IN”) above your Graduation Date (May 2014).  Likewise, for your main heading, put your name in the first column and your information (address, email, phone number, etc.) stacked beside it. This easy to do with design software like Adobe InDesign, but is also possible to do with Microsoft Word.

On the other hand, if your résumé is looking a little bare, make sure you fill it up. You want to utilize one full page – no more, no less. Simply reverse a few of these tips to give it some additional length. If including coursework, addresses, or extra spacing between categories fills out a page without creating noticeable empty areas, then do it. Just remember that those should be the first things to go when you gain more applicable material.